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BRAMKAMP LAB

Understanding how Prokaryotic Cells Organise in Space and Time

 

RESEARCH

PROJECTS

Our laboratory is dedicated to deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for the spatio-temporal arrange-ment of biochemical processes and to understanding how life ultimately arises from a variety of biochemical reactions.

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CYTOKINESIS AND

MORPHOGENESIS

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MEMBRANE
DYNAMICS

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ANTIBIOTICS

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CHROMOSOME

ORGANIZATION

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ADVANCED

IMAGING

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PHAGE BIOLOGY

 

OUR LAB

Bacterial cells show a remarkably complex subcellular organization.
Although, most bacteria lack sophisticated endomembrane systems they employ various mechanisms to ensure precise spatio-temporal organization of the diverse cellular processes.

 

We use advanced imaging methods including single-molecule localization microscopy to study cellular structures with nanometer resolution. Our research ultimately aims at understanding how the precise organization of biochemical reactions leads from chemistry to life.

Our lab was established in 2006 at the University of Cologne. After several years being Professor of Microbiology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (LMU) Prof. Marc Bramkamp followed a call to the
Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel in 2019, where he is chair of microbial biochemistry and cell biology and
head of the bioimaging facility (https://www.biologie.uni-kiel.de/zm/de/).

 
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NEWS

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Molecular powerhouse of the cell division motor

Interdisciplinary research teams from the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry and the Institute of General Microbiology at Kiel University show that dynamic proteins can deform the cell membrane of bacterial cells and thus initiate cell division.

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How proteins regulate the outer envelope of
bacterial cells

Research team in Kiel has identified the involvement of so-called flotillin proteins in the fluidization of bacterial cell membranes.

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New piece of the puzzle in the architecture of life

Kiel research team investigates previously-unknown reproduction mechanism in the biotech-relevant bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum.

 
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Prof. Dr. Marc Bramkamp

Chair of Microbial Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Institute of General Microbiology

Kiel University

Biocenter - Am Botanischen Garten 1-9
D-24118 Kiel
Germany

Email: bramkamp@ifam.uni-kiel.de
Phone: +49 (0)431 880 4341

Room: 119

 

SECRETARY

Dagmar Haacks

Chair of Microbial Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Institute of General Microbiology

Kiel University

Biocenter - Am Botanischen Garten 1-9
D-24118 Kiel
Germany

Email: dhaacks@ifam.uni-kiel.de
Phone: +49 (0)431 880 4330

Fax: +49 (0)431 880 2194

Room: 114a

 

 

BRAMKAMP
LAB

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